Category Archives: Osprey ecology

UV researches Kielder in depth

Before covering the events of 19 July…  most readers will know our Nest 1A and Nest 2 males, White YA and Yellow 37, hatched at Glaslyn in North Wales. Their half sister, Blue W7, has a problem with her right … Continue reading

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Coincidence – but what a fantastic one!

The last blog reported the appearance of 2013 Perthshire born Blue YS on Nest 1 on Saturday. Here is another image of him. Just two days later his sister landed on the same nest. The siblings are from a nest … Continue reading

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VY is in Northern Senegal

After almost a week of no data it was a huge relief to receive a very partial download of data tonight. VY, unlike Loch of the Lowes FR4 – who roosted only a few km from VY on 8 September – … Continue reading

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Qualitative stereopsis and other matters

The chicks continue to develop rapidly on all three nests. On Nests 1 and 2 they are peeping over the edge quite often. They move their heads from side to side – a behaviour called qualitative stereopsis which Paul described in … Continue reading

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Maps and migration

This year we had the thrill of receiving our first ever sightings of Kielder ospreys away from the local area. First, within a week in the summer, came news of two Kielder born ospreys who had made it back to … Continue reading

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Down under!

Ospreys are present on every continent except Antarctica. In Australia they are non-migratory and tend to be found in coastal areas, wetlands and offshore islands. One such island with a small population is Rottnest Island, a reserve 11 miles off … Continue reading

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Incubation and hatching – more science!

The very wet and not very warm weather on Saturday meant the ospreys stayed tight on their eggs. Typically in the UK males take a turn for no more than about 35% of daylight hours and the females are usually … Continue reading

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