Comparisons

UV’s activity in the first ten days of February has been similar to last month with most of his perches being inland rather than on the coast of northern Senegal. He is still flying for up to four hours a day. How does 2017 so far compare to 2016?

In 2016 UV had a more extensive range as these two images show.

UV's range: from the northern part of the Langue de Barbarie to it's southern end

UV’s range: from the northern part of the Langue de Barbarie to the southern end

UV's range: more inland activity and a more compact area

UV’s range: more inland activity and a more compact area

Despite travelling much further south on many days in early 2016 – and doubless catching fish on his offshore forays there – the current hunting ‘hotspot’ between the two sections of the Langue de Barbarie featured in 2016 too.

2016: nearly 2 hours flying

2016: nearly 2 hours flying near the northern end of the south spit on 18 Jan

2017: a longer sortie

2017: a longer sortie in a similar area

The top image was made in January 2016. Although the scale is slightly different you can see the change in the coastal landscape between the two images. The tip of the south spit is gradually receding and the sandy lump on the mainland at the right of the images is growing. Both are the result of the creation of the breach in the Langue de Barbarie in 2003, an event we’ve mentioned many times before.

When UV travels to the most eastern area of his current range he often meanders there yet flies high for part of that trip. On return he frequently races back towards the coast. The return journey is usually downwind so he has a ‘helping hand’ to achieve some impressive speeds. A helpful graphic by Paul of one excursion.

courtesy Paul Wildlifewriter

courtesy Paul Wildlifewriter

56 knots is 103 kph or 64 mph. Not bad going!

This entry was posted in Abroad, Blue UV, Migration and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Comparisons

  1. jw4926 says:

    Thank you so much Joanna for the update and you Paul, once a again for the fantastic graphics. Is it usual for an osprey on migration to stay in a relatively small area (’17 cf ’16)? Do we know?

  2. Vic says:

    Whatever the Osprey rule book says about their behaviour and habits they usually ignore it!

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