Nest 2: food for thought

The last blog about Nest 2 mentioned that chick 3 was often being removed from the line when a fish is delivered. This behaviour has continued with chick 2 almost always the guilty party.

A common occurence at feeding (c) Forestry Commission England

A common occurence at feeding, chick 2 about to send chick 3 away
(c) Forestry Commission England

Even when chick 2 has a very full crop and has stopped eating bar an odd bite sometimes it will rear up and deter chick 3 from re-joining the feed. Both chicks 1 and chick 2 eat to the point their crops seem about to burst. A bulging crop is common at this stage but the pair take it to a new level, topping up every few minutes if fish is available. A fish seldom lasts long enough for a second meal.

chick 1 tops up despite looking full to the brim! (c) Forestry Commission England

chick 1 tops up despite looking full to the brim!
(c) Forestry Commission England

37 appears to be bringing sufficient fish although the overall number per day isn’t known. The interval between meals seen during streaming varies which could unsettle the chicks. Chick 2 was noticeably more aggressive towards chick 3 on 24 June when the chicks hadn’t fed for over 3 hours – not a long gap but the previous fish had been small.

Is that all there is for lunch? (c) Forestry Commission England

Is that all there is for lunch?
(c) Forestry Commission England

It didn’t satisfy their appetites and they suffered rain for most of the time before the next meal. The next fish was much larger and there was plenty of food for all but chick 2 prevented chick 3 from eating for nearly 20 minutes.

It is unusual for such behaviour to persist when there is no shortage of food. When the chicks were tiny EB would stop feeding them even though they were still begging. This may have contributed to a sense of insecurity for chick 2.

Because 37 is supplying enough fish chick 3 is developing quite well but is still very small compared to its siblings.

a height advantage for chick 1 over chick 3 (c) Forestry Commission England

a height advantage for chick 1 over chick 3
(c) Forestry Commission England

You can see chick 3 had eaten well during that meal!

The chicks are spending more time preening and also move nest material about.

chick 2 does housework whilst chick 1 preens (c) Forestry Commission England

chick 2 does housework whilst chick 1 preens
(c) Forestry Commission England

They are starting to exercise their wings. Here chick 1 revs up from a crouched position!

And even small chick 3 is finding its feet.

chick 3 is a bit unsteady still (c) Forestry Commission England

chick 3 is a bit unsteady still
(c) Forestry Commission England

There have been several intrusions in the last week. Most have been observed over the fell rather than very close to the nest. However on 24 June a pale male with a white colour ring on the right leg came much too close for EB’s comfort. Was it YA?

Is the intruder YA? (c) Forestry Commission England

Is the intruder YA?
(c) Forestry Commission England

The intruder flew low a couple of times with his feet stretched out towards the nest as he was directly over it. YA wasn’t visible on Nest 1A at that time, having flown off just before 16.00 but we’ll never know if it was him.

 

 

 

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