UV’s more northerly ‘popular places’

In late February UV was spending much of his time on the small island east of the part of the Langue de Barbarie north of the breach. We had hoped to get near it during the pirogue trip described in the last post but the currents and rough sea meant only the larger fishing pirogues could cross the channel. Plan B was to try and approach it from the north, taking in the end of the Langue de Barbarie where UV was still spending some time. And he is now – this image shows a few visits over the last couple of days including this morning!

UV's visits to the north spit from the afternoon of 15 March to 10.33 on 17 March

UV’s visits to the north spit from the afternoon of 15 March to 10.33 on 17 March

The last fix, the yellow one, is approximately here.

Looking towards the rougher seas of the breach (c) Joanna Dailey

Looking towards the rougher seas of the breach
(c) Joanna Dailey

You can see in the Google Earth image that UV stuck to an area quite near the end of the spit. Recently that has been his preference whereas earlier he would spend hours on the little island in the bay. This is the eastern end of that island.

The eastern end of UV's island near the tip of the north spit (c) Joanna Dailey

The eastern end of UV’s island near the tip of the north spit
(c) Joanna Dailey

One reason UV may be using it less is the presence of people. In late February there was human foraging activity on the small island and also the beach nearby. About 2 kms further north a small encampment could be seen.

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Back at the end of north spit Ospreys abounded, showing little interest when we left the pirogue albeit at some distance from them.

Three in a row (c) Vic Paine

Four in a row
(c) Vic Paine

Many of the poles were occupied, although not this group. This photo is of an area very close to the fixes on the Google Earth image. Was UV on one of them today?!

UV's talon prints are on this area (c) Vic Paine

UV’s talon prints are on this area
(c) Vic Paine

The amount of plastic and other rubbish was disturbing to see. The tides and currents make the area near the breach a natural dumping ground.

This is the tip of the north spit; if the photo had been taken at 10.33 today UV would be in it.

The very end of the north spit (c) Joanna Dailey

The very end of the north spit
(c) Joanna Dailey

Looking to the north again mounds of vegetation like this could explain some of the times UV appears to be perched in water, although low tide is a more probable reason.

The top of the lagoon where UV perches often (c) Joanna Dailey

The top of the lagoon where UV perches often
(c) Joanna Dailey

From the north spit the remains of Doune Baba Dieye could be seen across the river – and to the left the young Casuarina trees planted recently, their even spacing drawing attention.

The new planting is visible just north of the ruins of Doune Baba Dieye (c) Joanna Dailey

The new planting is visible just north of the ruins of Doune Baba Dieye
(c) Joanna Dailey

Our pirogue set off south to literally test the water. Were conditions sufficiently calm near the shore to get near the tip of the mainland where UV had been the previous day? The Google Earth image shows a slight overlap with the island.

Heading north beside the island on which Doune Baba Dieye was destroyed (c) Joanna Dailey

Heading north beside the island on which Doune Baba Dieye was destroyed
(c) Joanna Dailey

Unfortunately we were unable to travel that far and haze prevented any photo opportunities. However a landing on the island was possible. Although UV wasn’t there that day some other Ospreys were present in one fairly small area. Including one who posed for several minutes as the pirogue neared the land.

A tolerant Osprey (c) Joanna Dailey

A tolerant Osprey
(c) Joanna Dailey

Heading back to Saint Louis more Ospreys – and other birds – were hunting or perched. Here are a few more great photos by Vic of another memorable day. Our thanks to Papa Dieye, our guide and pirogue driver who acts as a bird guide at Djoudj National Park in addition to taking visitors to the area around the mouth of the Senegal River. Few of his clients will have as specific destinations in mind as the three people he met that February day!

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This entry was posted in Abroad, Blue UV, Migration. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to UV’s more northerly ‘popular places’

  1. M Simmonds says:

    Thank you for such an informative report. What a shame you didn’t get to see him.

    • joannadailey says:

      It was a shame we missed him that day but fortunately we did see him morning and late afternoon in other places the following day! And learning about the habitat was a big plus.

  2. Dolly Cox says:

    Fantastic. Wonderful to read about all the osprey and human adventures. Lovely pictures too. Thank you.

  3. greg sanders says:

    2 birds sighted at Bakethin today!

  4. joannadailey says:

    Nothing from a visit to Bakethin early today, Greg, and nothing on Nest 1 or Nest 2 cams. Yet!

    • joannadailey says:

      Hi Greg, I assumed that the BirdGuide sightings page was your source, Alan does a great job putting them on the RSPB pages.

      There was nothing seen on the Nest 1 and Nest 2 cams today, nor from field observations at Bakethin for 1.5 hrs approx.

      Nest 3 recordings will be checked tomorrow.

      As soon as we have any confirmed sightings we will put a blog out.

  5. greg sanders says:

    Nice one Joanna! hoping to get over as soon as some arrivals are confirmed!- Good luck for the season!

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