Kielder 2009: the first Northumbrian Osprey chicks for over 200 years

After summering at Kielder for a couple of years and finding a female in 2008 an unringed male Osprey settled on a newly built platform in March 2009. Within a couple of weeks he was joined by an unringed female, possiby the 2008 bird. With no nestcam the dates of egg laying and hatching are unknown, but as the chicks grew the monitoring Forestry Commission Rangers and Kielder Ornithologist were delighted to see three healthy looking youngsters exploring their nest.

Rediscovered video of the ringing of these chicks is the source of these stills, a wonderful record of that historic year.

The first chick to be ringed looked around and at the new bling, not at all shy.

The first ever Kielder chick to be ringed (c) Forestry Commission England

The first ever Kielder chick to be ringed
(c) Forestry Commission England

Another view (c) Forestry Commission England

Another view
(c) Forestry Commission England

A historic ring (c) Forestry Commission England

A historic ring
(c) Forestry Commission England

The second chick was given a White Darvic KC. The process was filmed from slightly further away so there isn’t a close up of the ring.

The second chick to be ringed awaits the big moment! (c) Forestry Commission England

The second chick to be ringed awaits the big moment!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Another still of White KC after the BTO and Darvic rings had been fitted.

This is a big nest! (c) Forestry Commission England

This is a big nest!
(c) Forestry Commission England

The third chick was given Darvic ring White KH.

White KH just after receiving two rings (c) Forestry Commission England

White KH just after receiving two rings
(c) Forestry Commission England

It looks as though the beak may have suffered in a scrap over a fish, perhaps.

White KH again (c) Forestry Commission England

White KH again
(c) Forestry Commission England

Waiting to go back to the nest (c) Forestry Commission England

Waiting to go back to the nest
(c) Forestry Commission England

One chick wasn’t keen on posing!

One chick lies low (c) Forestry Commission England

One chick lies low
(c) Forestry Commission England

We’ve had no sightings reported of any of the 2009 chicks and the unringed parents are no longer with us. But they left a legacy for the Osprey population of Northern England because their 2010 chick Blue 35 has produced six chicks in her first two years of breeding at Foulshaw Moss with the Lake District’s White YW.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this ‘look back’. Thank you for your interest in Kielder Ospreys and best wishes for the festive season to all our readers.

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8 Responses to Kielder 2009: the first Northumbrian Osprey chicks for over 200 years

  1. Mary G. Kerr says:

    Thank You for the lovely blog Joanna. I do hope White KM is still flying high. I somehow think I will remember this ring number quite easily.
    I wish you, Paul and Everyone at Kielder a Merry Christmas and a Productive 2016.

  2. Mary G. Kerr says:

    I certainly will Joanna lol…

  3. Mike says:

    Thank you Joanna for a great blog as always. Merry Christmas to you all as we look forward to 2016.
    It’s questionable who travels the most!!. lol.

  4. greg sanders says:

    nice to reflect upon- the Kielder crew are building every year- heres hoping that platform at Bakethin gets used in 2016- would be great viewing point!

  5. Sheila Elliott says:

    How wonderful to find a piece of history and a part of the jigsaw. With osprey, I think it is a case of ‘never say never’. Recent sightings in Gambia prove that illusive osprey can suddenly be found. The 2009 brood were lovely looking chicks. Here’s to another successful year for you all.

  6. vivien Finn says:

    A lovely blog, Joanna. A Happy New Year to you and all at Kielder Ospreys. I hope 2016 will be the best year yet for returning Ospreys.

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