Home and away

a Crossbill has the freedom of the nest (c) Forestry Commission England

a Crossbill has the freedom of the nest
(c) Forestry Commission England

The breeding season is very close now, although the adults at Kielder aren’t usually among the early returners like the Glaslyn pair, 37 and YA’s parents. The Kielder camera system is still warming up with some limited streaming as the solar powered batteries charge. Nests 1 and 2 will be on the big screen in Kielder Castle Cafe very soon. On Thursday the Nest 1 feed was turned on for a time and within 20 minutes a bird had landed – an adult female Crossbill who busied herself eating lichens growing on some of the twigs on the nest.

A Family Osprey Day will take place on Saturday 28 March at Kielder Castle with a range of activities. (The booking is only required for the Guided Walk, just turn up for anything else.) Whatever the weather something should appeal!

That is the home’ bit, now the ‘away’ – an update on UV in Northern Senegal. For the second week he has been upstaged by his cousin 7H!  But (with a couple of exceptions) UV has been quite sedentary so there isn’t much to report. First, a nice weather graphic from Paul. If there is high cloud spectrometers on satellites can’t ‘see through’ it to identify fog. This didn’t apply on 6 March as illustrated on this graphic from Paul.

a foggy day for UV

a foggy day for UV

Fog may partly explain some slightly unusual behaviour by UV on 8 March. Here is an image of the day.

8 March activity

8 March activity

UV travelled down to the phosphate mine area in late morning but only spent about an hour there. He usually flies directly back to the coast but this time he had frequent short stops along the way. Was he loitering because he could see fog ahead? Or maybe it was just a lazy Sunday afternoon! When he reached the coast he went north past Fas Boue which is just beyond his regular turning point. He made two more trips to the sea late in the afternoon so overall it was an active day compared to most recently.

The other interesting behaviour was on 13 March when after spending the morning in his inland roost area UV went to the coast. For the first time in a while he expended energy with some fairly high flying, heading out to sea three times and reaching altitudes between 418m and 538m. He also reached over 450m altitude when flying back to his inland roost in the afternoon. Why?!

UV flies high out to sea late morning

UV flies high out to sea late morning

Today the data arrived at lunch time. UV had moved position several times in the night. He has just started roosting overnight in the area immediately behind the beach – the sort of terrain used by Rutland’s 30(05) further up the coast.There is no obvious weather-related reason for UV to need to move in the dark. Early this morning he visited the mine for the second time this week but was back on the coast by late morning.

Later next week there will be a blog about 7H after her seven weeks of ‘radio silence’. She was on a pylon on the last fix today, but there was some interesting behaviour too. More anon!

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Blue UV, Migration, Osprey updates, Public Events and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Home and away

  1. thehutts says:

    It was always said that it would be a good year for crossbills last year with all the cones around! Looking forward to seeing them and hopefully 2 pairs of ospreys over Easter! Sally

  2. Vivien Finn says:

    Lovely to read reports on both Ospreys again, Joanna. Thank you.

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