Visits and a probable departure

The high winds at the weekend meant that when the juveniles were on the nests they tended to be either lying down trying to get below the gusts or standing facing into the wind. Since then they have seen much less often – unless there is food, of course! – which has presented opportunities for other birds.

Begging for a titbit (c) Forestry Commission England

Begging for a titbit
(c) Forestry Commission England

Sometimes one or two corvids appeared despite an osprey being present.

Look behind you! (c) Forestry Commission England

Look behind you!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Mainly the juveniles made their feelings clear and any visitors left. The focus on food continues to dominate. Both males have continued to bring in good supplies, with two ‘part fish’ on the nests at times. Some juvenile behaviour is quite interesting, with a sizeable new fish being ignored for a smaller remnant, and sometimes the smaller piece has been the object of a tussle even though there is another fish. Both rainbow trout, so what is so appealing about the smaller piece? But usually the newer catch is preferred.

Blue VT abandons a perfectly good meal for something fresher (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VT abandons a perfectly good meal for something fresher
(c) Forestry Commission England

Of course sometimes you need to keep control of a good supply.

Blue UV attempts to protect a new fish and the one he was eating (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue UV attempts to protect a new fish AND the one he was eating
(c) Forestry Commission England

As ever there is competition when a new fish arrives.

YA beats a hasty retreat as Blue VT and Blue VV both want to eat NOW (c) Forestry Commission England

YA beats a hasty retreat as Blue VT and Blue VV both want to eat NOW
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 7H gets to the fish first as Blue 9H plans her snatch tactic (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 7H gets to the fish first so Blue 9H plans her snatch tactic
(c) Forestry Commission England

Osprey sightings in southern areas of the UK are becoming commonplace as migration gets under way. Where there has been breeding adult females generally leave first, they are relatively out of condition after months of incubating or protecting and feeding young. Some well known females have left in recent days, for example EJ (Loch Garten), Lady, as she is known to many, (Loch of the Lowes) and Glesni (Dyfi).

Mrs 37 from Nest 2 hasn’t been seen at her nest since 17 August. At 12.20 she landed with a partly eaten fish which Blue 8H took. She stayed for a couple of minutes, fiddling with a stick, before flying off. Was that the start of her long journey south? Very possibly. We wish her a safe journey, safe few months at her winter home, and safe return next year.

The last time Mrs 37 was seen on the nest (c) Forestry Commission England

The last time Mrs 37 was seen on the nest
(c) Forestry Commission England

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2 Responses to Visits and a probable departure

  1. Bonne Route et bon retour Mrs 37.

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