Nest 2 update

There has been little drama at Kielder this season since hatching. That big event was mostly in bad weather so a worrying time. But the adults on both nests were outstanding in protection and fish supply duties. Since then – is it really only three weeks since the last hatch? – the main points of interest have been on Nest 1 with a few intrusions, some bullying and concerns about the relatively low front nest edge. Life on Nest 2 has been calmer, although chick 1 bullied early on especially. The nestcam angle is great for watching the chicks, but not so good for seeing the adults. So this post highlights them! In this image from Friday the contrast between 37’s yellow eyes and the chick’s amber eyes is very apparent.

The difference between 37's yellow eye and the chick is striking (c) Forestry Commission England

The difference between 37’s yellow eye and the chick’s amber eye  is striking
(c) Forestry Commission England

The juvenile ospreys lose the amber colour as they mature. Usually; a few retain the darker colour, the most well known osprey being Monty at Dyfi. 37 was down on the nest rather more today than usual, although he is often only as far away as the nestcam pole judging by the shaking images when he lands and takes off. On one ‘drop down’ to the nest today he and his offspring appeared to be in deep communication for several minutes whilst Mrs 37 ate.

37 and his chicks just looked at each other for several minutes (c) Forestry Commission England

37 and his chicks just looked at each other for several minutes
(c) Forestry Commission England

37 often glances up at the nestcam pole before flying to it; here is a typical instance.

37 considers his jump up to the pole (c) Forestry Commission England

37 considers his jump up to the pole
(c) Forestry Commission England

Meanwhile Mrs 37 gets on with adding to the nest edge!

Mrs 37 puts a bit more protection on the edge favoured by the chicks (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs 37 puts a bit more protection on the edge favoured by the chicks
(c) Forestry Commission England

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