Stick or bust

The last few days at Kielder have seen plenty of feeding on Nests 1 and 2, with the chicks looking ‘fit to bust’ after a session. They are mainly sleeping or feeding with occasional forays around the nest and preening. And growing day by day.

The fish deliveries have varied in size.

YA brings a rather small offering on Monday evening (c) Forestry Commission England

YA brings a rather small offering on Monday evening
(c) Forestry Commission England

Whereas 37 knows what will keep the family happy! (c) Forestry Commission England

Whereas 37 knows what will keep the family happy!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Feeding sessions are now over 30 minutes long. A chick sometimes has a rest then returns for more.

On Tuesday an almost whole fish was eaten in about an hour by the chicks and female (c) Forestry Commission England

On Tuesday an almost whole fish was eaten in about an hour by the chicks and female
(c) Forestry Commission England

You can see the chicks’ head feathers are well developed now and the eyes are amber. And the wings are looking quite impressive, especially to a younger chick!

The oldest chick shows off its wingspan (c) Forestry Commission England

The oldest chick shows off its wingspan
(c) Forestry Commission England

On Monday evening there was a heavy shower in the Nest 1 area. Mrs YA now can’t cover the chicks, but she did her best as they tried to tuck under her.

Mrs YA tries to offer shelter to three chunky chicks! (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs YA tries to offer shelter to three chunky chicks!
(c) Forestry Commission England

At roughly the same time on Nest 2 all was fair and all the nest occupants had a nap.

Mrs 37 and the chicks dozing (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs 37 and the chicks dozing
(c) Forestry Commission England

On both nests sticks and clods of earth are arriving, but whereas on Nest 2 the sides are being relatively evenly built up, on Nest 1 YA has concentrated on the rear of the nest where the chicks seldom venture.

Wouldn't that stick be more  useful on the other edge? (c) Forestry Commission England

Wouldn’t that stick be more useful on the other edge?
(c) Forestry Commission England

Virtually every stick is moved a number of times – Mrs YA and YA seldom agree on placement.

Yet another stick tussle (c) Forestry Commission England

Yet another stick tussle
(c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs YA seems to realise more needs to be done on the lake side edge, but she placed two twigs behind two chicks effectively penning them in near the edge. They did escape!

Mrs YA has just placed sticks her side of the chicks, not on the edge (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs YA has just placed sticks her side of the chicks, not on the edge
(c) Forestry Commission England

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2 Responses to Stick or bust

  1. Mrs YA needs to go on a building course – or is it ‘elf and safety instruction she needs?

  2. thehutts says:

    That rain on Monday night – soaked my washing before I got home from Kielder – it probably then went on to soak the chicks as I think they were easterlies. You have some great screen grabs there – must learn how to do it on a PC! Sally

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