Hail and farewell!

Mrs 37 tries to escape the cage! (c) Forestry Commission

Mrs 37 tries to escape the cage!
(c) Forestry Commission

Wednesday at Kielder was pleasant with sunny periods, although a coolish breeze persisted; it was back to some heavy hail showers and strong winds on Thursday. On the osprey nests the females have been doing the bulk of the incubation. On Wednesday 37 continued  reconstruction of Nest 2. From the image it looks like he was trying to build a cage around Mrs 37! He has done a good job building up the sides of the nest to pre-storm damage height, although the new model is a bit less tidy. Click on any of the images to enlarge them.

37 pops in but Mrs 37 stays right down on the eggs (c) Forestry Commission

37 pops in but Mrs 37 stays right down on the eggs
(c) Forestry Commission

On Thursday morning 37 was on the nest a few times, but without fish or twigs. He seemed prepared to do his stint incubating despite the hail but Mrs 37 stayed well down on the eggs and on each visit he said farewell to her after a few minutes. On both nests the eggs haven’t been turned very often. And when they are, it is a pretty rapid push around. As the earlier post about incubation explained it is in the early days of incubating that turning is most crucial. And with the cold weather the parents are not exposing the eggs for long.

Mrs YA is hunkered down whilst YA perches nearby (c) Forestry Commission

Mrs YA is hunkered down whilst YA perches nearby
(c) Forestry Commission

At Nest 1, YA spent most of Thursday morning in a tree near the nest. Like Mrs 37, Mrs YA was very low on the eggs. Even her head wasn’t visible at times. The ‘long shot’ camera is on a young tree and it was swaying quite wildly in the wind so watching felt a bit like being on the waves!

Elsewhere, Glesni, the new female osprey at Dyfi produced her first ever egg on Wednesday evening, great news. Also on Wednesday Tweed Valley announced their first chick had hatched, probably the first in Scotland. Congratulations to both projects.

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3 Responses to Hail and farewell!

  1. viv blake says:

    We’re on the way, with a first chick. But we may have to wait for a while yet.

  2. Elizabeth B says:

    So Joanna with this unseasonable cold weather is it likely that it will take longer than usual for the eggs t hatch?

    • joannadailey says:

      It may have a bit of an impact, Elizabeth, although the incubating ospreys are keeping very tight on the eggs. Nest 2 will be a good benchmark because the first two eggs were laid on the same dates last year. So if the first egg to hatch is after 4 June, it will be later than last year! And that was on the ‘late’ end of average in a not too good Spring.

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