CN2 returns and Nest 1A news

Yesterday was a ‘CN2 free’ day on Nest 2. 37 brought two fish for Y6 within 90 minutes.

Y6 gets ready! (c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 gets ready!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 ate on the nest for nearly an hour then flew away with the remains.

The second delivery (c) Forestry Commission England

The second delivery
(c) Forestry Commission England

37 left with the trout after a few minutes of waiting for Y6. She arrived a bit later to relieve 37 of his catch as he landed.

Y6 takes the second fish (c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 takes the second fish
(c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 left immediately and there was no further activity on the nest.

Today when the stream started Y6 was standing on the nest edge. It wasn’t long before CN2 emerged from the mist.

CN2 lands. Y6 is behind him (c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 lands. Y6 is behind him
(c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 evicts CN2 (c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 evicts CN2
(c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 tried to dislodge Y6 but the plucky juvenile held firm.

CN2 flies at Y6 (c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 flies at Y6
(c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 stayed on the nest for another 20 minutes without incident, then there was an empty nest until 11.26 when CN2 landed. He was on and off for about an hour. He returned with a stick at 12.25 followed by Y6. Press HD for best quality.

CN2 was the first of the pair to return to the nest for a short time but since before 13.00 only Y6 has been seen. She preened, looking relaxed, for over an hour.

Y6 preening (c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 preening
(c) Forestry Commission England

Over on Nest 1A Y1 and Y3 haven’t been seen since yesterday morning.

Y3 about to fly (c) Forestry Commission England

Y3 about to fly
(c) Forestry Commission England

Y1 leaves the perch (c) Forestry Commission England

Y1 leaves the perch
(c) Forestry Commission England

This morning YA waited in vain for a juvenile.

No interest in YA's fish (c) Forestry Commission England

No interest in YA’s fish
(c) Forestry Commission England

Is this our last sight of YA this season? (c) Forestry Commission England

Is this our last sight of YA this season?
(c) Forestry Commission England

Perhaps the Nest 1A juveniles will appear again but the good weather conditions yesterday were ideal for migration as the many records on birding websites confirm.

 

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Nest 2 update

Within the last half hour 37 has arrived with a fish for Y6. Normal service resumes, we hope.

37 about to fly, Y6 about to eat (c) Forestry Commission England

37 about to fly, Y6 about to eat
(c) Forestry Commission England

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Nest 2 is too interesting!

The last post described another visit to Kielder by UV, who is most attracted to the Nest 2 area. He isn’t the only one. There have been more intrusions recorded by the nestcam on that nest than Nest 1A.

The weather on Saturday was very poor and there were no intrusions. EB brought a fish for the three juveniles, 37 delivered two. EB and Y5 haven’t been since so could have begun their migrations early on Sunday.

When the nestcam started on Sunday Blue CN2 was on the nest – he is a 2013 male from Dumfries and Galloway who has been seen at Kielder previously in 2016.

Blue CN2 making himself at home (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue CN2 making himself at home
(c) Forestry Commission England

He was present on and off for at least 2 hours 40 minutes. Here is a video of parts of that visit, plus EB exhibiting similar behaviour a few days earlier.

playCN2 left the nest without persuasion by 37 who delivered a fish for Y4 and Y6 an hour later. The day progressed normally thereafter.

On Monday the nest was empty during a wet morning but both juveniles were around in the afternoon. There was a visit from one from another nest, possibly Y7 from Nest 4.

Y7, possibly (c) Forestry Commission England

Y7, possibly. Y4 isn’t happy!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Yesterday both juveniles were on the nest when streaming began, preening and food soliciting. It wasn’t long before intrusions began, at first by a distant osprey but that soon changed.

An unringed intruder touches down (c) Forestry Commission England

An unringed intruder touches down
(c) Forestry Commission England

Things went downhill for the juveniles from that point.

CN2 divebombs Y4 (c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 divebombs Y4
(c) Forestry Commission England

CN2’s repeated low flights over the nest resulted in Y4 flying off and CN2 making himself at home.

CN2 'at home' (c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 ‘at home’
(c) Forestry Commission England

He was on and off most of the rest of the day. Y6 tried to return to the nest but was pushed off by CN2. Here is a video of  the events in the morning.14080983_836373679832111_918645105_n

Today Y6 has been on and off the nest – she was shouting at a bird on her first landing but it was unseen by the nestcam.

Y6 on the nest briefly (c) Forestry Commission England

Y6 on the nest briefly
(c) Forestry Commission England

CN2 was thought to be male when ringed and physically the thin tarsi and long legs plus lightly speckled shallow chest band support that. But the behaviour is much more like a female.

It is of some concern that 37 hasn’t been seen for over a day however Y6’s crop does not look as empty as CN2’s and 37 could be provisioning Y4 and Y6 elsewhere.

The weather is good for migration so we may not see much more of the remaining members of the Nest 2 family this year. Y4 and Y6 must be looking forward to peace and quiet elsewhere!

 

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News about a couple of Kielder males

Although UV had a day off visiting Kielder on Wednesday he was back on Thursday and displayed his usual close interest in Nest 2. Inspection of footage didn’t find even a distant dot but comparing his data with the nestcam showed his impact late in the day.

On Thursday EB spent more time on the nest than any of the juveniles but the nest was empty most of the day. In late afternoon EB, who had been preening, started mantling as an intruder approached – from the times that bird was UV.

EB mantles as UV approaches (c) Forestry Commission England

EB mantles as UV approaches
(c) Forestry Commission England

By early evening there were less frequent fixes showing UV’s position. But he was in the Nest 2 area when EB decided action to escort an intruder away was required and she took off. UV left Kielder Forest a little later.

EB about to fly after an intruder, probably UV (c) Forestry Commission England

EB about to fly after an intruder, probably UV
(c) Forestry Commission England

The other ‘Kielder’ male is 2011 Nest 1 hatch Blue 39/Bracken, who has been seen at Derwent Reservoir several times recently. Gary Nicholson has sent these great photos of Blue 39, taken this morning. Eventually he left with his sizeable catch to eat elsewhere, but gulls not crows or herons were the final straw! Many thanks to Gary for the information and permission to share his photos.

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

(c) Gary Nicholson

 

 

Posted in Blue 39, Blue UV, Osprey updates, UK | Tagged | 3 Comments

UV visits youngsters at Kielder!

On 15 August UV paid a relatively short visit to Kielder Forest – under four hours. The next day he returned for about eight hours. His presence was noted by ospreys at two nests at least, Nests 2 and 4. He – or his impact – may be visible on footage at Nest 3 when it is downloaded tomorrow. The first part of this post will cover the Nest 2 intrusions then Paul will describe events at Nest 4.

UV’s battery has been very near shut down because until this week the weather has been overcast or wet and he has been sheltering in woods which has exacerbated the situation. So on 15 August fixes were infrequent but some were very near Nest 2 and Nest 3. On his first pass across the Nest 2 site no ospreys were on the nest but it was a different matter an hour or so later. The fix at 13.03 BST showed UV perched on a clear fell near Nest 2. Before he arrived there he annoyed Y4 and Y6.

Intruder alert! (c) Forestry Commission England

Intruder alert!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Is that UV? (c) Forestry Commission England

Is that UV?
(c) Forestry Commission England

Given the number of intrusions at Nest 2 why do we think that was UV? On the next image you can just make out the tracker on his back.

UV flies away (c) Forestry Commission England

UV flies away
(c) Forestry Commission England

The intruder circled over the immediate nest area for several more minutes but wasn’t caught by the nestcam.

Between the 13.03 fix and the next one at 13.54 UV moved position. At 13.18 Y4 and Y6 appeared to react to an instruction from an adult to lie flat – thanatosis. They couldn’t resist following some action in the sky.

Are the juveniles watching UV being escorted away? (c) Forestry Commission England

Are the juveniles watching UV being escorted away?
(c) Forestry Commission England

This could have been either 37 or EB escorting UV away from the clear fell, where he would have been very visible to an over-flying bird. His next perch was in a block of timber out of line of site of the nest. This interpretation is speculation but the next day there is clearer evidence thanks to a combination of more fixes and UV cooperating better with the nestcam!

UV arrived around 11.00 BST. A few minutes later a fix showed him apparently perched on Nest 2 and the nestcam confirmed it.

UV lands on the nest edge (c) Forestry Commission England

UV lands on the nest edge
(c) Forestry Commission England

Here’s the footage of the event.

The next fix showed UV perched a short distance away; almost certainly on the tree that housed the nest platform from 2011-2013. The Nest 2 family still use it to perch and eat.

UV didn’t stay long but returned in the afternoon. Shortly before 14.00 for about 30 minutes he was around the area and at times close to the nest. Like this time!

UV flies low over Nest 2 (c) Forestry Commission England

UV flies low over Nest 2 and Y6
(c) Forestry Commission England

He then perched on clear fell. The nestcam showed an intruder in the sky during this period, yet fixes were quite close together. Did UV have another quick sortie? No, the osprey flew close enough to determine it was unringed.

Not UV (c) Forestry Commission England

Not UV
(c) Forestry Commission England

Neither the fixes nor the nestcam suggest UV re-visited the immediate surroundings of the nest.

On 16 August he spent more time near Nest 4 than Nest 2, which is usually his focus.  All the information is from tracking which uses UTC for fixes, so add on an hour to convert to BST. Over to Paul…

On Tuesday morning, Y8 had flown away from the nest and was down in a nearby valley, when he had some uninvited company… It was UV! The two young birds remained within 30m of each other for about half an hour before both flew off in different directions. Y8 landed further along the block margin, where he was again joined by UV a few minutes later…

Courtesy Paul Wildlifewriter

Courtesy Paul Wildlifewriter

This time, the track indicates that both were on the same perch or in adjacent trees. They remained together for a few minutes until 12:45 UTC, when UV flew off again in the direction of Nest 2.

This behaviour confirms many observations of young ospreys being quite relaxed in each other’s company, when well away from any nest. It is comparable to their behaviour down in Africa during the winter, where ospreys seem to be much more companionable and even roost overnight in small communal groups.

Posted in Blue UV, Nest 4, Osprey updates, UK | Tagged | 2 Comments

Look who didn’t migrate!

At 09.55 this morning Mrs YA who hasn’t been seen since early on 7 August landed on her nest as if it was a couple of hours later.

Hello again! (c) Forestry Commission England

Hello again!
(c) Forestry Commission England

She was closely followed by YA and their behaviour took us back to courtship in March -although Mrs YA was rather more submissive than YA.

Submissive behaviour (c) Forestry Commission England

Submissive behaviour
(c) Forestry Commission England

Is it really her? (c) Forestry Commission England

Is it really her?
(c) Forestry Commission England

The conditions over the weekend were very good for migration so quite why Mrs YA didn’t leave is a mystery. She seems in good condition and was soon requesting a fish.

Mrs YA 'chats' to YA (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs YA ‘chats’ to YA
(c) Forestry Commission England

YA flew off soon afterwards. Y1 landed but Mrs YA didn’t stay on the nest long after his arrival.

Mrs YA leaves (c) Forestry Commission England

Mrs YA leaves
(c) Forestry Commission England

This would have been a very early departure for Mrs YA who migrated in the last week of August both of the last two years. Her chicks fledged early this year so she may leave soon but hopefully we’ll see some more of her over the next couple of weeks.

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Nest 3 update

The latest download of footage from the Nest 3 camera plus field observations indicate the family spend long periods away from the nest although it is still the focus for food. The female was last seen on the nestcam on 12 August.

The female finishing off a remnant (c) Forestry Commission England

The female finishing off a remnant
(c) Forestry Commission England

Given limited coverage she may not have begun her migration yet but more and more ospreys are heading south. This may be our last view of her this year.

The youngsters are eating well with plentiful supplies even in the recent poorer weather.

This is VH's fish, no argument... (c) Forestry Commission England

This is VH’s fish, no argument…
(c) Forestry Commission England

... and this is VR's! (c) Forestry Commission England

… and this is VR’s!
(c) Forestry Commission England

Down goes the tail.

VR finishes his meal (c) Forestry Commission England

VR finishes his meal
(c) Forestry Commission England

On a couple of clips an intruder has been in the area; in this short video of part of one incident a distant osprey can be seen heading left, then a pair of legs hover over the nest. Press HD for best quality.

The juveniles are over 80 days old – the age regarded as the start of the migration period – but often youngsters remain for another two or three weeks. The next download at the end of the week will show ‘what happened next’ on Nest 3.

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