Fledging video

Here is the video of the later three fledges on Nests 1 and 2 today.

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Blue VV adds to the tally: all Nest 1 young fledge in one day!

What an incredible day!

The previous post contains the bare bones about the first three fledges on Kielder Nests 1 and 2; an hour and 1 minute after Blue 8H took to the skies Blue VV, who looked uncertain, flew confidently away from Nest 1. So four fledges in just over six hours. Wow!

To summarise, the fledged ospreys in order of fledging are:-

Blue VT, who is one of the first two hatches on Nest 1; they were so close together (within a maximum of 13 hours off camera) it has been impossible to identify the elder chick of the pair. Fledged at 09.28

Blue UV the youngest Nest 1 chick by a day and a bit. Fledged at 14.30

Blue 8H eldest Nest 2 chick. Fledged at 14.31

Blue VV the other of the first two hatches on Nest 1. Fledged at 15.32

Usually a male osprey fledges before slightly older female siblings. And Blue UV has done the most flapping, jumping and helicoptering on Nest 1. Blue VT seemed to do the least before fledging although she was normally first to grab a fish. She wasn’t blown off the nest, it was a calm day, so her fledge was a bit of a surprise to observers. Here is a video of her confident first flight. Without the ‘long shot’ camera we would not have known because she was out of view of the nestcam.

That camera was valuable later too, because she arrived back in the area and was visible on trees around the nest before her landing –  an accomplished one – back ‘home’.

YA is in the top of a tree left of the nest; Blue VT is below him (c) Forestry Commisison England

YA is in the top of a tree left of the nest; Blue VT is below him – the white blob!
(c) Forestry Commisison England

Blue VT has just landed; Blue UV  thinks 'I could do that' (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VT has just landed; Blue UV thinks ‘I could do that’
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue UV and Blue VV seemed rather unsettled by their sister’s departure and for most of the morning stayed out of nestcam shot too, just standing in a corner or immediately under the nestcam. But her arrival stimulated both movement into the centre of nestcam range and flapping and jumping. It only took 10 minutes for Blue UV to decide he could match Blue VT. Images on the previous blog, video to follow.

Over on Nest 2 the young ospreys hadn’t done much exercise all morning. When the nestcam stream started Blue 8H was eating a fish. Soon after Mrs 37 took over and the other two fed from her and then snoozed; 37 brought a new trout in at 11.35 but they didn’t bother to get up so off he went with it. From about 12.30 Blue 7H and Blue 8H flapped and jumped at times, but there was no real preparation before Blue 8H’s leap off the edge at 14.31. Image of take off on previous post.

Blue 7H tracks Blue 8H's first flight (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 7H tracks Blue 8H’s first flight
(c) Forestry Commission England

She returned within a couple of minutes, inspiring some flapping from her sisters. But the next fledge was on Nest 1.

Blue VV sat on the edge of the nest after Blue VT’s return and Blue UV’s fledge, flapping her wings at times. Blue VT seemed to think she needed encouragement to fly because she leapt across the nest and landed on Blue VV, almost pushing her off.

Blue VT jumps across the nest landing on Blue VV (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VT jumps across the nest landing on Blue VV
(c) Forestry Commission England

But it took quite a few more flaps before take-off, which was greeted by a then packed Kielder Castle Cafe with loud cheers!

Blue VV on the edge flapping, but not quite sure (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VV on the edge flapping, but not quite sure
(c) Forestry Commission England

Off Blue VV flies (c) Forestry Commission England

Off Blue VV flies
(c) Forestry Commission England

A really remarkable day at Kielder, and perhaps a review of the footage between 17.30 and 20.00 will show yet another fledge!

 

 

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One…. two, three OFF!!!

Three fledges today – so far!

First to fledge at 09.28 on Nest 1 was Blue VT, flying confidently towards the water. We couldn’t confirm until much later as she was off nestcam shot.

Blue VT flaps... (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VT flaps…
(c) Forestry Commission England

...a jump... (c) Forestry Commission England

…a jump…
(c) Forestry Commission England

... and away! (c) Forestry Commission England

… and away!
(c) Forestry Commission England

She returned to the nest for the first time at about 14.20. This spurred Blue UV on and he flew off at 14.30, closely followed on Nest 2 at 14.31 by Blue 8H.

Blue UV prepares to leave for his first flight (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue UV prepares to leave for his first flight
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue UV heads towards the water (c) Forestry Commission england

Blue UV heads towards the water
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 8H prepares to fly (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 8H prepares to fly
(c) Forestry Commission England

 

 

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Osprey Watch Report: 27 July. And update

A panoramic shot of Osprey Watch looking towards Nest 1 (c) Neil Richardson

A panoramic shot of Osprey Watch looking towards Nest 1. Taken on Saturday
(c) Neil Richardson

Another day without the benefit of the live camera feed so we really can’t offer much detail of life on the nest today. Joanna arrived as we were setting up to check the monitor, but no joy. Instead, she updated with more recent video clips of the chicks helicoptering and set them to run in a loop. So we left the note on the white board explaining the lack of live action.

Our weather today contrasted with yesterday’s sunshine. The morning was dry and visibility was reasonable but not good enough to make up for the lack of camera stream. We did observe the adults flying around near and onto the nest but couldn’t identify fish deliveries and didn’t spot the adults perching on their trees in the morning. However, we could see the chicks stretching their wings and helicoptering.

At lunchtime, the weather promised in the forecast began to threaten and at 1pm, the heavens opened and we had to cover the scopes quickly and protect the rest of the kit without getting too wet ourselves. That set the tone for the rest of the afternoon and we regularly debated abandoning our posts, only for the rain to ease and more visitors to arrive enthusiastic about seeing ospreys. Amazingly, most times we uncovered the telescopes, there were the chicks bobbing up and down on the nest and, by then, the adults on their trees observing from a good distance. The showers were sudden and heavy and occurred throughout the afternoon until just before 4.30pm we saw the next black cloud heading in and decided it was time to call it a day. Even then there were disappointed visitors who had to make do with looking through the files of photos of the two nests in the café. But they did seem to enjoy that almost as much.

We reckon we had 122 visitors, including some from America and all parts of the UK. Many had knowledge of other Osprey sites and all brought an interest and enthusiasm, particularly the younger visitors. Near the end of the day, a young girl showed us a photo she had taken from the ferry, of an osprey with a fish. We encouraged her to send it to the blog so we hope it arrives.

So, all in all, a very enjoyable day, despite the lack of live camera feed and the rain! As the crew of the ferry said as we left “back to normal then”!

Lynda, Joe and David

Editor’s comments

Although it must have been frustrating for the Osprey Watch volunteers and visitors to be without the live camera feed, at Kielder Castle Cafe for much of the day the only way to see all three Nest 1 chicks was via the ‘long shot’ camera because two stationed themselves in ‘private’ areas of the nest! Well done to the young girl who took the photo of an osprey; we’d love to put it on the blog.

There were two part eaten fish on the nest when the streaming started at 09.00. These enabled the chicks to snack intermittently until YA brought in a fresh catch at about 15.15. This was snatched by, you guessed it, Blue VT. The new fuel intake inspired her to make her biggest leap/mini helicopter of the day about an hour later.

Blue VT's jump is tracked by her siblings (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VT’s jump is tracked by her siblings
(c) Forestry Commission England

The highest/longest helicoptering of the day was by Blue UV; it lasted 17 seconds and he went beyond the nest edge before drifting back. Heartstopping stuff for humans! The image below is from an earlier more modest effort of just 5 seconds.

YA looks on from the top of a tree on the left as his son White UV helicopters (c) Forestry Commission England

YA looks on from the top of a tree on the left as his son Blue UV helicopters
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VV was less active than the other two, but she did have a few large leaps during the day.

Blue VV tries to show off her prowess but Mum isn't looking (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue VV tries to show off her prowess but Mum isn’t looking
(c) Forestry Commission England

Finally, an image of three great looking youngsters on one of the occasions they were all in view of the nestcam.

The chicks together for once (c) Forestry Commission England

The chicks together for once
(c) Forestry Commission England

 

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Osprey Watch Report: 26 July and further update

I arrived soon after 9am having been alerted to potential problems with the live camera feed. Joanna joined me soon after having already checked the feed to the Kielder Castle Cafe screen. Initially the Leaplish screen showed a frozen image of the Nest 1 chicks and Joanna investigated whether it was possible to show Nest 2 instead. Unfortunately this proved impossible so Joanna kindly loaded some recent video clips. Everything was set up by around 10.30, including a note on the white board explaining the lack of live action.

With the camera stream out of action and with lots of visitors we were kept busy all day and had to rely to a great extent on what the visitors told us they were seeing through the scopes. Our chances of observing the nest came each time we re-positioned the scopes having failed to mention quickly enough to visitors that they should try to avoid moving them. The large number of visitors (approx 220) meant that many observations unfortunately went unrecorded.

The chicks helped visitors by doing lots of flapping, wing stretching and jumping and the sunshine on their white fronts made them easy to see (for the majority). The parents visited occasionally and also spent time in their ‘usual’ trees, including for a brief period both sitting in ‘their’ tree to the left of the nest.

The chicks continued to flap and hop throughout the day and the visitors kept rolling in despite the heat – only the volunteers were flagging (two of us wore our black Osprey tee shirts which really soaked up the heat!). Around 4.30 we packed away all but one scope, a few leaflets, the photo folders and a visitor list. Two volunteers with long journeys ahead of them left and I stayed for another hour to talk to late comers and to give them a chance to see the chicks on the nest.

The visitors were again from all over the country and one family were Italian. There were lots of family groups and together parents and volunteers patiently explained what to look for through the scopes and we all shared in the delight when the chicks were at last seen, helpfully flapping away. A really good, if rather hot and tiring day.

Margaret, Joyce and Neil

Editor’s comments

Well done the team in trying conditions, and especially a hot and tired Margaret for staying on to show late arriving visitors the action. It was an exciting day with quite a few ‘helicoptering’ episodes. The wind picked up in the afternoon and inspired the youngsters to use that extra lift!

By the time Kielder Castle Cafe closed (17.30) the youngsters had been settled for a while, but maybe tomorrow’s review of late evening recorded footage will reveal a fledge.

A few images follow, but to get the best experience here is a video of two of the young ospreys taking important steps – or ‘flights’ – towards fledging. As for Blue VV, she may surprise us and be first to take off.

Early in the day Blue VT jumped right across the nest (c) Forestry Commission England

Early in the day Blue VT jumped right across the nest
(c) Forestry Commission England

Just after noon Blue UV jumps high across the nest from the rear as Blue VT flaps vigorously (c) Forestry Commission England

Just after noon Blue UV jumps high across the nest from the rear as Blue VT flaps vigorously
(c) Forestry Commission England

Soon after 14.00 both Blue VT and Blue UV jump high in unison. Blue VV admires the lovely view (c) Forestry Commission England

Soon after 14.00 both Blue VT and Blue UV jump high in unison. Blue VV admires the lovely view
(c) Forestry Commission England

Soon after 15.00 Blue UV heads for a well judged touch down on the nest edge (c) Forestry Commission England

Soon after 15.00 Blue UV heads for a well judged touch down on the nest edge
(c) Forestry Commission England

YA is to the left and Mrs YA to the right as they watch their offspring (c) Forestry Commission England

YA is to the left and Mrs YA to the right as they watch their offspring
(c) Forestry Commission England

 

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Nest 2 exercises

Nest 2 is a much smaller nest than Nest 1. Whilst not as cramped as it looks from the nestcam angle it is still not spacious for three youngsters to flap and jump. This can lead to some uncomfortable moments for napping ospreys.

A soft landing for Blue 8H! (c) Forestry Commission England

A soft landing for Blue 8H!
(c) Forestry Commission England

All three chicks are flapping their wings for 30 seconds or more, accompanied by hops and jumps. Quite often the jumps are onto the nest edge.

Blue 7H heading for the edge (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 7H heading for the edge
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 8H during a sustained wing flapping exercise (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 8H during a sustained wing flapping exercise
(c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 9H executing a jump to the edge (c) Forestry Commission England

Blue 9H executing a jump to the edge
(c) Forestry Commission England

Better than still images, here is a link to a video of the three young ospreys.

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First Kielder ‘grandchicks’ take to the air!

Avid osprey fans will no doubt have seen the CWT Foulshaw Moss blog announcing that their chicks have fledged. Wonderful news for them, and for us because the adult female is 2010 Kielder born Blue 35. So the three young fledglings are our first ‘grandchicks’ as far as we know.

This is another major step in the re-establishment of ospreys in in the north of England. Our congratulations to CWT on a great first breeding season. And many thanks for their generosity in sharing their images with us. Here are a few of the latest photos.

A stormy sky on the horizon a couple of days before fledging (c) Cumbria Willife Trust

A stormy sky on the horizon a couple of days before fledging
(c) Cumbria Wildlife Trust

A day before the first fledge (c) Cumbria Wildlife Trust

A day before the first fledge
(c) Cumbria Wildlife Trust

Only one left! (c) Cumbria Wildlife Trust

Only one left!
(c) Cumbria Wildlife Trust

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